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Influencer and former Big Brother housemate (30) warns against fox eye facelift

Ryan Ruckledge, 30, from Blackpool, warned on This Morning about a

The influencer and former Big Brother housemate has warned against ‘fox eye’ facelifts after claiming he was left in hospital with a serious infection after receiving free treatment.

Ryan Ruckledge, 30, from Blackpool, told Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield on This Morning how he was gifted with the 20-minute procedure, which is a minimally invasive, non-surgical procedure that lifts your browbones and the outer corners of your eyes.

However, the influencer said he then woke up feeling like he’d been hit by a bus, and two weeks later his face was so infected that it began to swell and ooze pus.

He ended up in hospital and at one stage doctors feared the infection, which lasted for six months, might have been sepsis.

The 30-year-old explained that he woke up at ‘6am’ after the operation and said: ‘When I woke up I was like, “Oh my God, have I been hit by a bus?” It was terrible.”

Ryan Ruckledge, 30, from Blackpool, warned on This Morning about a

Ryan Ruckledge, 30, from Blackpool, warned on This Morning about a “fox eye” facelift after claiming he was left in hospital with a serious infection after free treatment.

An infection started two weeks after that, causing his face to swell and ending up in hospital with doctors fearing the infection may have been sepsis.

An infection started two weeks after that, causing his face to swell and ending up in hospital with doctors fearing the infection may have been sepsis.

Ryan admitted he was offered a £500 fox-eye facelift via a free message in exchange for promoting the company on his Instagram and did no research beforehand.

Ryan admitted he was offered a £500 fox-eye facelift via a free message in exchange for promoting the company on his Instagram and did no research beforehand.

Appearing on the program today, Ryan said he was offered a £500 fox-eye facelift via a free message in exchange for promoting the company on his Instagram and did no research beforehand.

The £500 treatment uses dissolvable stitches to create almond-shaped eyes with a raised tail and is aimed at giving women lifted brows and upper lids with no downtime after surgery, as it only takes half an hour – and should heal completely. less than two weeks.

Called the fox eye lift, clinics advertise the procedure on social media with before-and-after videos of patients with the corner of their eyes pulled up and back dramatically.

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The looks of American A-listers Bella Hadid and Kim Kardashian’s sister Kendall Jenner are often cited as inspirations, and in the UK models Katie Price and Danielle Lloyd have admitted to the treatment.

After the procedure, Ryan said he woke up feeling like he had been

After the procedure, Ryan said he woke up feeling like he had been “hit by a bus” and ended up in the hospital.

What is a fox eye facelift?

How does it work

The fox-eye threadlift procedure, which costs between £350 and £500, involves injections of local anesthetic around the temples before a cannula – a thin hollow tube with a blunt end – is pushed under the skin.

A thread is introduced into the cannula, and with the help of a needle and careful movements of the hands, it is irritated upwards. On the underside of the thread are small, wavy discs that attach to the tissue in the face and allow the skin to be pulled up and held in place.

A finger is then placed at the very end of the thread to ensure that it remains firm as the cannula is withdrawn.

Since the procedure involves the insertion of a single needle that heals itself, it is not technically considered surgery.

Shutdown

The stitch dissolves over time with minimal side effects. The skin folds and needle impression will fully heal within 3-10 days, leaving behind a natural lift.

Costs

Average price is £500-750.

How long it takes?

The results last up to a year.

How is it different from surgery?

There are no permanent changes to your face and you won’t have part of your eyelid cut away like in blepharoplasty. You can also adjust the changes after the treatment if you want a less dramatic look.

Describing the procedure, he said it wasn’t “too painful” because the area was numbed beforehand.

However, he admitted: “It was quite energetic.

She threaded my eyebrows, but I also had my cheeks threaded.

“I wanted a more elevated look.

But when he woke up he wasn’t feeling well, he explained: ‘After a few days it started to swell but I thought, “That’s probably normal.”

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“The infection started about two weeks after that.

He continued: “I went to the doctors for antibiotics but they didn’t work.

“I ended up in the hospital on antibiotic drips. Nothing got rid of it.”

He continued: “My body was actually reacting to the thread that was in my eye.

“It was supposed to dissolve after a few months and heal with this raised look, but because my eye was rejecting it, it didn’t heal.

“All the pus was coming out and I had to deal with it on my own.

As well as doctors fearing he had contracted sepsis, Ryan has previously spoken about how the procedure could have left him ‘blind’.

After the program showed photos of his swollen face and the aftermath of the procedure, Ryan joked: “Imagine trying to pull a guy like that, I look like an avatar!”

When the presenters asked about the clinic’s post-procedure assistance, Ryan said, “I don’t feel like I’m supported in the aftercare, no.”

Ryan added that the experience really affected his mental health. The 30-year-old said: “I didn’t want to go out.

“When I came out, people were staring at my face like I was some kind of freak. It really affected me mentally.’

And he admitted he wants corrective surgery because he believes one eyelid is now more droopy than the other and thinks it makes him look ‘old’.

Meanwhile, Ryan also revealed how guilty he feels about promoting the procedure on his social media.

Holly and Philip then spoke to Dr Pamela Benito, a specialist in facial aesthetics, who said that fox-eye lifts are not without risk, but can be done safely.

Ryan added that the experience really affected his mental health and that he didn't want to go out because he felt like 'some kind of weirdo'.

Ryan added that the experience really affected his mental health and that he didn’t want to go out because he felt like ‘some kind of weirdo’.

Holly and Philip then spoke to Dr Pamela Benito, a specialist in facial aesthetics, who said that fox-eye lifts are not without risk, but that they can be done safely.

Holly and Philip then spoke to Dr Pamela Benito, a specialist in facial aesthetics, who said that fox-eye lifts are not without risk, but that they can be done safely.

She said it is important for people to do their research and find the right doctor who is clinically qualified and knows what they are doing.

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She said: ‘It’s unfortunate that it went wrong and every medical procedure has its risks.’

Dr. Pamela went on to explain that people should also have a consultation with them before the procedure.

The end of messed up lips? Experts want prescription-only fillers to be made in a crackdown on Britain’s ‘wild west’ cosmetics market

Dermal fillers and lip injections should only be available on prescription to keep the public safe from botched facial cosmetic procedures, MPs have said.

Moving to a prescription model would crack down on cowboy practitioners by making doctors responsible for administering the treatment, experts argued.

This would require Britons to have a personal consultation with a medical professional capable of prescribing, such as a doctor, who would explain the risks and benefits of the procedure.

Professor David Sines, chairman of the Joint Council for Cosmetic Practice, called for the move to apply to dermal filler injectors, which deliver various substances under the skin.

Under current rules, there are no compulsory qualifications required to become a cosmetic surgeon in the UK, meaning that anyone can complete basic training and then perform dermal filler treatments.

The comments were made to MPs on the Health and Social Care Committee during a session on the impact of body image on mental and physical health.

“We believe they should become prescription-only devices because if they were, there would be a requirement for supervision by prescribers, which would provide greater protection for the public,” Professor Sines said.

Thousands of Britons, mostly women, get dermal fillers every year, a procedure in which a substance, usually hyaluronic acid, is injected into the face to fill in wrinkles or to make the lips and cheekbones look bigger or brighter.

The procedure has boomed in recent years as women aspire to look like celebrities such as Kylie Jenner and Kim Kardashian, prompting concerns from experts who fear Britons are falling prey to a largely unregulated cosmetic beauty industry.

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